Department of Psychology

University of Mississippi

Migraines’ Causes, Treatments Topic for Oxford Science Cafe

UM psychologist Todd Smitherman to share research on neurological illness at March 24, 2015 public science forum

Cover art for Todd Smitherman’s ‘Advances in Psychotheraphy’ textbook

Cover art for Todd Smitherman’s ‘Advances in Psychotherapy’ textbook

The causes and treatments for migraine headaches is the next topic for a monthly public science forum organized by the University of Mississippi Department of Physics and Astronomy.

The spring semester’s second meeting of the Oxford Science Cafe is set for 6 p.m. March 24 at Lusa Pastry Cafe, 2305 West Jackson Ave. Todd Smitherman, associate professor of psychology, will discuss “Migraine: Knowns and Unknowns.” Admission is free.

“Migraine is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of severe head pain accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound,” Smitherman said. “This talk will review recent scientific progress in migraine across these and other areas, differentiating between what is well-established from empirical research – the ‘knowns’ – and what remains to be understood – the ‘unknowns.’”

Smitherman’s 30-minute presentation is geared toward everyone, including both people who suffer from migraines and those who don’t.

“Data from the World Health Organization indicate that migraine is the third most common medical condition and eighth leading cause of disability on the planet,” he said. “Despite its high prevalence and impact, migraine remains underdiagnosed and inadequately treated, though recent scientific advances offer new hope for combatting this chronic condition.”

In the last two decades, substantial progress has been made in understanding migraine pathophysiology, headache triggers and the role of common co-occurring conditions, as well as in establishing effective treatments.

Smitherman earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from Auburn University and his bachelor’s degree from Samford University. His research areas include migraine and psychiatric comorbidity, behavioral interventions for headache, health psychology/behavioral medicine, and anxiety and depression in pain patients.

At UM, he teaches undergraduate courses in General Psychology, Learning, Abnormal Psychology and Health Psychology. His graduate classes include Seminar: Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders, Clinical Practicum and Issues and Ethics in Human Research and Professional Psychology.

MARCH 13, 2015 BY EDWIN SMITH